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(Vaccines for) Adults Ages 19 Through 26

 

Source: Department of Health and Human Services
Related MedlinePlus Pages: College Health

Experiencing Hair Loss? Your Hair Care Matters

 

Source: American Academy of Dermatology
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Hair Loss

Treatment for Hair Loss

 

Source: American Academy of Dermatology
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Hair Loss

Vaccine Safety: MedlinePlus Health Topic

 

Source: National Library of Medicine - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Childhood Immunization, Immunization

ClinicalTrials.gov: Vaccine Safety

 

Source: National Institutes of Health - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Vaccine Safety

Vaccine Safety

 

Source: National Library of Medicine

What are vaccines?

Vaccines play an important role in keeping us healthy. They protect us from serious and sometimes deadly diseases. Vaccines are injections (shots), liquids, pills, or nasal sprays that you take to teach your body's immune system to recognize and defend against harmful germs. The germs could be viruses, bacteria, or parasites.

Vaccines contain germs (or parts of germs) that cause disease. The germs have been killed or weakened enough that they won't make you sick. But they will spark an immune response, which helps your body fight off the germs. Your immune system will also remember the germ and attack it if that germ ever invades again. This protection against a certain disease is called immunity.

Since these diseases can be very serious, it is safer to get immunity from a vaccine than from getting sick with the disease.

Do vaccines cause side effects?

As with medicines, any vaccine can cause side effects. Most of the time the side effects are minor, such as a sore arm, fatigue, or mild fever. They usually go away within a few days. These common side effects are often a sign that your body is starting to build immunity against a disease.

Serious side effects from vaccines can happen, but they are very rare. These side effects could include a severe allergic reaction. Other possible side effects can be different for each vaccine. Talk with your health care provider if you're concerned about your health after getting vaccinated.

Some people worry that childhood vaccines could cause autism. But many scientific studies have looked at this and have found no link between vaccines and autism.

How are vaccines tested for safety?

Every vaccine that is approved in the United States goes through extensive safety testing. It starts with testing and evaluation of the vaccine before it's approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This process can often take several years.

  • First, the vaccine is tested in labs. Based on those tests, the FDA decides whether to test the vaccine with people.
  • Testing with people is done through clinical trials. In these trials, the vaccines are tested on volunteers. Clinical trials usually start with 20 to 100 volunteers, but eventually include thousands of volunteers.
  • The clinical trials have three phases. The trials are looking for the answer to important questions such as
    • Is the vaccine safe?
    • What dose (amount) works best?
    • How does the immune system react to it?
    • How effective is it?
  • During the process, the FDA works closely with the company who makes the vaccine to evaluate the vaccine's safety and effectiveness. If the vaccine is found to be safe and effective, it will be approved and licensed by the FDA.
  • After a vaccine is licensed, experts may consider adding it to the recommended immunization schedule. The immunization schedule is from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It lists which vaccines are recommended for different groups of people. They list which age groups should get which vaccines, how many doses they need, and when they should get them.

Testing and monitoring continue after the vaccine is approved:

  • The company making the vaccines tests every batch of vaccines for quality and safety. The FDA reviews the results of these tests. It also inspects the factories where the vaccine is made. This helps make sure the vaccines meet standards for quality and safety.
  • The FDA, CDC, and other federal agencies continue to monitor its safety, to watch for possible side effects. They have systems to track any safety issues with the vaccines.

These high safety standards and testing help to make sure that vaccines in the United States are safe. Vaccines help protect against serious, even deadly, diseases. They not only protect you, but also help to keep these diseases from spreading to others.

When Your Child Is Diagnosed with Cancer

 

Source: National Cancer Institute - From the National Institutes of Health Video
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Cancer in Children

Emotional Support for Young People with Cancer

 

Source: National Cancer Institute - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Cancer--Living with Cancer

Young People Facing End-of-Life Care Decisions

 

Source: National Cancer Institute - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: End of Life Issues

Do Not Use: Black Salve is Dangerous and Called by Many Names

 

Source: Food and Drug Administration
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Health Fraud

Holiday Celebrations and COVID-19

 

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Related MedlinePlus Pages: COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019)

Clinicalinfo: Information on HIV/AIDS Treatment, Prevention, and Research

 

Source: National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: HIV/AIDS, HIV/AIDS Medicines, HIV/AIDS and Infections, HIV/AIDS and Pregnancy, HIV/AIDS in Women, Living with HIV/AIDS

HIV and Gay and Bisexual Men

 

Source: National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: HIV/AIDS

HIV and Older People

 

Source: National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: HIV/AIDS

HIV and Mental Health

 

Source: National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Living with HIV/AIDS

What's a Blip?

 

Source: National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Living with HIV/AIDS

What is an Opportunistic Infection?

 

Source: National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: HIV/AIDS and Infections

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

 

Source: National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: HIV: PrEP and PEP

HIV Medicines During Pregnancy and Childbirth

 

Source: National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: HIV/AIDS and Pregnancy

Pets and People with HIV

 

Source: National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Living with HIV/AIDS

The Basics of HIV Prevention

 

Source: National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: HIV/AIDS

Fruit and Vegetable Safety

 

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Food Safety

Tips for Talking to Your Teen About Vaping

 

From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: E-Cigarettes, Smoking and Youth

Diets Rich in Fish and Vegetables May Boost Your Brain Power

 

From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Diets, Nutrition for Older Adults

Bad Sleep Patterns Could Up the Risk of Heart Disease in Older Adults

 

From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Healthy Sleep, How to Prevent Heart Disease

Breastfeeding and Pregnancy Could Lower Risk of Early Menopause

 

From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Breastfeeding, Menopause

Contact Lenses Slow Children's Nearsightedness

 

Source: National Institutes of Health - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Eye Wear, Refractive Errors

Tired or Wired? Caffeine and Your Brain

 

Source: National Institutes of Health - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Caffeine

Discoveries in Basic Science: A Perfectly Imperfect Process

 

Source: National Institutes of Health - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Understanding Medical Research

Opioid Facts for Teens

 

Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse - From the National Institutes of Health - PDF
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Opioid Misuse and Addiction

Debunking COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Myths

 

Source: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
Related MedlinePlus Pages: COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019)

Bronchoscopy and Bronchoalveolar Lavage (BAL)

 

Source: National Library of Medicine - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Breathing Problems, Bronchial Disorders, COPD, Chest Injuries and Disorders, Collapsed Lung, Cough, Endoscopy, Lung Cancer, Lung Diseases, Pulmonary Fibrosis, Tracheal Disorders

Fluoroscopy

 

Source: National Library of Medicine - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: X-Rays

Myelography

 

Source: National Library of Medicine - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Back Pain, CT Scans, Herniated Disk, Spinal Cord Diseases, Spinal Stenosis, X-Rays

Barium Swallow

 

Source: National Library of Medicine - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Esophagus Disorders, GERD, Hiatal Hernia, Peptic Ulcer, Stomach Disorders, Swallowing Disorders, Throat Disorders


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