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Genetics Home Reference: nonketotic hyperglycinemia

 

Source: National Library of Medicine - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders, Genetic Brain Disorders, Newborn Screening

Caregiver Health

 

Source: National Library of Medicine

What is a caregiver?

A caregiver gives care to someone who needs help taking care of themselves. The person who needs help may be a child, an adult, or an older adult. They may need help because of an injury, chronic illness, or disability.

Some caregivers are informal caregivers. They are usually family members or friends. Other caregivers are paid professionals. Caregivers may give care at home or in a hospital or other health care setting. Sometimes they are caregiving from a distance. The types of tasks that caregivers do may include

  • Helping with daily tasks like bathing, eating, or taking medicine
  • Arranging activities and medical care
  • Making health and financial decisions

How does caregiving affect the caregiver?

Caregiving can be rewarding. It may help to strengthen connections to a loved one. You may feel fulfillment from helping someone else. But caregiving may also be stressful and sometimes even overwhelming. Caregiving may involve meeting complex demands without any training or help. You may also be working and have children or others to care for. To meet all of the demands, you might be putting your own needs and feelings aside. But that's not good for your long-term health. But you need to make sure that you are also taking care of yourself.

What is caregiver stress?

Many caregivers are affected by caregiver stress. This is the stress that comes from the emotional and physical strain of caregiving. The signs include

  • Feeling overwhelmed
  • Feeling alone, isolated, or deserted by others
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Gaining or losing a lot of weight
  • Feeling tired most of the time
  • Losing interest in activities you used to enjoy
  • Becoming easily irritated or angered
  • Feeling worried or sad often
  • Having headaches or body aches often
  • Turning to unhealthy behaviors like smoking or drinking too much alcohol

How can caregiver stress affect my health?

Long-term caregiver stress may put you at risk for many different health problems. Some of these problems can be serious. They include

What can I do to prevent or relieve caregiver stress?

Taking steps to prevent or relieve caregiver stress may help prevent health problems. Remember that if you feel better, you can take better care of your loved one. It will also be easier to focus on the rewards of caregiving. Some ways to help yourself include

  • Learning better ways to help your loved one. For examples, hospitals offer classes that can teach you how to care for someone with an injury or illness.
  • Finding caregiving resources in your community to help you. Many communities have adult daycare services or respite services. Using one of these can give you a break from your caregiving duties.
  • Asking for and accepting help. Make a list of ways others can help you. Let helpers choose what they would like to do. For instance, someone might sit with the person you care for while you do an errand. Someone else might pick up groceries for you.
  • Joining a support group for caregivers. A support group can allow you to share stories, pick up caregiving tips, and get support from others who face the same challenges as you do.
  • Being organized to make caregiving more manageable. Make to-do lists and set a daily routine.
  • Staying in touch with family and friends. It's important for you to have emotional support.
  • Taking care of your own health. Try to find time to be physically active on most days of the week, choose healthy foods, and get enough sleep. Make sure that you keep up with your medical care such as regular checkups and screenings.
  • Considering taking a break from your job, if you also work and are feeling overwhelmed. Under the federal Family and Medical Leave Act, eligible employees can take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave per year to care for relatives. Check with your human resources office about your options.

Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

How to Talk About End-of-Life Decisions

 

Source: American College of Emergency Physicians
Related MedlinePlus Pages: End of Life Issues

Tips from the ER on Childproofing Your House

 

Source: American College of Emergency Physicians
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Child Safety

Heat Stroke and Hot Cars

 

Source: American College of Emergency Physicians
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Heat Illness, Motor Vehicle Safety

Mind and Body Practices for Older Adults

 

Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Complementary and Integrative Medicine

American Adults' and Children's Use of Yoga, Mediation, and Chiropractors: National Health Interview Survey 2017

 

Source: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Chiropractic, Complementary and Integrative Medicine

Eating Disorders: Statistics

 

Source: National Institute of Mental Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Eating Disorders

Get Excited about the Brain!

 

Source: National Institute of Mental Health - From the National Institutes of Health - PDF
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Anatomy

Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder: The Basics

 

Source: National Institute of Mental Health - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Child Mental Health

Travel for Work: Fitness Tips for Business Travelers

 

Source: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Exercise and Physical Fitness

Exercise Examples and Videos

 

Source: Department of Agriculture - Video
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Exercise for Older Adults

Fitness: All Guides

 

Source: Children's Hospital Boston
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Exercise and Physical Fitness

New Blood Test May Predict Alzheimer's Disease

 

Source: National Institutes of Health - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Alzheimer's Disease

Risks of Vaping: A Look at Safety

 

Source: National Institutes of Health - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: E-Cigarettes

Caring for Concussions: More Than a Bump on the Head

 

Source: National Institutes of Health - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Concussion

The Hidden Epidemic of Prediabetes

 

From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: How to Prevent Diabetes, Prediabetes

Embracing Autism Diagnosis Helps Family Take Charge

 

From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Autism Spectrum Disorder

On the Front Lines Against Lyme Disease

 

From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Lyme Disease

HPV and Cervical Cancer: What You Need to Know

 

From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Cervical Cancer, HPV

Viola Davis on Confronting Prediabetes and Becoming her Own Health Advocate

 

From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Diabetes Type 2, How to Prevent Diabetes

New Options for Treating Type 2 Diabetes in Kids and Teens

 

From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Diabetes in Children and Teens

3 Key Research Highlights From NIH's Diabetes Branch

 

From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Diabetes Type 2, How to Prevent Diabetes

5 Questions About Intermittent Fasting

 

From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Diets

Depression

 

Source: Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Mood Disorders

Bipolar Disorder

 

Source: Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Mood Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov: Telehealth

 

Source: National Institutes of Health - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Telehealth

Osteoarthritis

 

Source: National Institute on Aging
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Osteoarthritis

Older Adult Mental Health

 

Source: National Library of Medicine - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Mental Disorders, Mental Health, Older Adult Health

Telehealth: MedlinePlus Health Topic

 

Source: National Library of Medicine - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Home Care Services, Rural Health Concerns, Talking With Your Doctor

ClinicalTrials.gov: Older Adult Mental Health

 

Source: National Institutes of Health - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Older Adult Mental Health

Telehealth

 

Source: National Library of Medicine

What is telehealth?

Telehealth is the use of communications technologies to provide health care from a distance. These technologies may include computers, cameras, videoconferencing, the Internet, and satellite and wireless communications. Some examples of telehealth include

  • A "virtual visit" with a health care provider, through a phone call or video chat
  • Remote patient monitoring, which lets your provider check on you while you are at home. For example, you might wear a device that measures your heart rate and sends that information to your provider.
  • A surgeon using robotic technology to do surgery from a different location
  • Sensors that can alert caregivers if a person with dementia leaves the house
  • Sending your provider a message through your electronic health record (EHR)
  • Watching an online video that your provider sent you about how to use an inhaler
  • Getting an email, phone, or text reminder that it's time for a cancer screening

What is the difference between telemedicine and telehealth?

Sometimes people use the term telemedicine to mean the same thing as telehealth. Telehealth is a broader term. It includes telemedicine. But it also includes things like training for health care providers, health care administrative meetings, and services provided by pharmacists and social workers.

What are the benefits of telehealth?

Some of the benefits of telehealth include

  • Getting care at home, especially for people who can't easily get to their providers' offices
  • Getting care from a specialist who is not close by
  • Getting care after office hours
  • More communication with your providers
  • Better communication and coordination between health care providers
  • More support for people who are managing their health conditions, especially chronic conditions such as diabetes
  • Lower cost, since virtual visits may be cheaper than in-person visits

What are the problems with telehealth?

Some of the problems with telehealth include

  • If your virtual visit is with someone who is not your regular provider, he or she may not have all of your medical history
  • After a virtual visit, it may be up to you to coordinate your care with your regular provider
  • In some cases, the provider may not be able to make the right diagnosis without examining you in person. Or your provider may need you to come in for a lab test.
  • There may be problems with the technology, for example, if you lose the connection, there is a problem with the software, etc.
  • Some insurance companies may not cover telehealth visits

What types of care can I get using telehealth?

The types of care that you can get using telehealth may include

For telehealth visits, just like with an in-person visit, it is important to be prepared and have good communication with the provider.

Older Adult Mental Health

 

Source: National Library of Medicine

Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel, and act as we cope with life. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, including as we age.

Many older adults are at risk for mental health problems. But this does not mean that mental health problems are a normal part of aging. Studies show that most older adults feel satisfied with their lives, even though they may have more illnesses or physical problems.

Sometimes, however, important life changes can make you feel uneasy, stressed, and sad. These changes could include the death of a loved one, retirement, or dealing with a serious illness. Many older adults will eventually adjust to the changes. But some people will have more trouble adjusting. This can put them at risk for mental disorders such as depression and anxiety.

It's important to recognize and treat mental disorders in older adults. These disorders don't just cause mental suffering. They can also make it harder for you to manage other health problems. This is especially true if those health problems are chronic.

Some of the warning signs of mental disorders in older adults include

  • Changes in mood or energy level
  • A change in your eating or sleeping habits
  • Withdrawing from the people and activities you enjoy
  • Feeling unusually confused, forgetful, angry, upset, worried, or scared
  • Feeling numb or like nothing matters
  • Having unexplained aches and pains
  • Feeling sadness or hopelessness
  • Smoking, drinking, or using drugs more than usual
  • Anger, irritability, or aggressiveness
  • Having thoughts and memories that you can't get out of your head
  • Hearing voices or believing things that are not true
  • Thinking of harming yourself or others

If you think that you may have a mental health problem, get help. Talk therapy and/or medicines can treat mental disorders. If you don't know where to start, contact your primary care provider.

Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features

 

Source: National Library of Medicine - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Epilepsy

Genetics Home Reference: constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome

 

Source: National Library of Medicine - From the National Institutes of Health
Related MedlinePlus Pages: Brain Tumors, Colorectal Cancer


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